t.h.a.n.k.s.

t.h.a.n.k.s.* Comments

31 slide projection loops were co-created daily by Mike Reandeau and Markuz Wernli Saitô and presented at the window of a private residence in San Jose's historical Reed district between April 10 through May 10, 2008. *(tiny. humble. ardent. now. knock. soul)

Below follow comments and interpretations that trickled in while project t.h.a.n.k.s. was going full swing. If you like join the conversation and tell us what you are grateful for.

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“Thank you very much for the wonderful inspirations on gratefulness. The concept and the resulting images are awesome, I am impressed. Especially in our Western world those silent thoughts go under all too often.”
commentsAngelika, Zurich

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“t.h.a.n.k.s. is fun to watch where thoughts from San Jose take YOU to most intricate places. Are you taking the pics of yourself by yourself?”
commentsMichelle, Morinaga

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“Project t.h.a.n.k.s. convinces through the fantastic photos: for me a bit esoteric but ingenious. Please keep going!”
commentsRita Lisa, Brunnen, Switzerland

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“I am grateful to be eating a slice of bread that I made today.”
commentsAnne, New York

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“Wow, these are really cool slides you've made Markuz! It's fun that you are the model in them all – how the heck do you take those photos of yourself?? I never know how you do these things, it's like magic! I can see how it would be hard to put these words into a picture, but you are doing a fabulous job. I'm sure the neighborhood is loving it, and i wish we could come check it out? Will you be taking photos frmo outside the house that we can see? I'd like to see what it looks like in real life too... Nice job! You are doing such cool stuff, it's great! I'll wait a few more days and then check it out again! Talk to you soon, and keep up the great work! ”
commentsKristen, Ashville, NC

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“Thinking about this project is exciting. You could invite other people to do similar things in other locations. Maybe invitations for people to create their own, rather than just vicariously enjoy your presentation. You could create a series that was similar (move the variables, for instance: things to be thankful for becomes ___, a projection in a home window becomes a ___ in a ___. etc.) like get your neighbors to do them. Local kids could take on the project? ”
commentsAvalon, Portland

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“My goodness! This moves me greatly! I love the way you've designed the project and will watch as it develops. Your slides for this project are sublime! Gratefully,”
commentsStewart, Kyoto

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“Are you familiar with Found Magazine and The Museum of Jurassic Technology?”
commentsPaul, Hong Kong

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“This is cool Markuz!! We look forward to taking part... We should all be grateful more often! And I am grateful for Markuz and Yuka!!”
commentsKristen, Ashville, NC

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“What a beautiful project! Markuz you are an artist of joy. I have a lot to be grateful for, small and large, and don't know if I want to put it out there like this...”
commentsJudith, Berne, Switzerland

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“I'm grateful to be able to live in a wonderful neighborhood. For the positive vibe that the project house exudes, and the warmth the art has put in my heart over the past few days. For the grumpy old Indian man in the corner grocery store who has recuperated from a life-threatening assault. For O'Donnell Gardens Park, which has enhanced the quality of our neighborhood, and is a place to meet great neighbors.”
commentsJames, San Jose

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RE: t.h.a.n.k.s. April 13, 2008 (Day 4)
“Guide posts, I'm sure they have been there but somehow, I didn't recognize them. It will be fun to look back and see if I can recognize them. One I do recognize is seeking assistance from Keith. What a difference that has made, look at the variations and interests within our lives.”
commentsNorman, Baltismore/San Jose

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“I had a look at your t.h.a.n.k.s pages – very interesting so far – how is the collaboration process working out?”
commentsNikki, Birmingham, UK

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“Thank you for sharing this with me. I think it is a wonderful way of expressing gratitude for things which are too often taken for granted.

If the question is asked to me, what am I thankful for today, my response would be Article 9 of the Japanese constitution and the fact that we have not had another such experience as Hiroshima and Nagasaki...

Keep up the creative work. In Peace, in the Now.”
commentsRobert, Kyoto

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“I have to say that I'm very affectionate for this project. I'm like a small child waiting to see what will happen :D. I think you chose a good format for the animations as well.”
commentsMD, Emeryville

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“'t.h.a.n.k.s.' so much for forwarding your t.h.a.n.k.s. project. It is great to hear and see what you are doing, and be inspired by your project of gratefulness. i love the idea of what you are doing now, screening little gratitudes outside a home window... it is nice to read them from over here.”
commentsSophie, Kyoto

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“Thanks indeed Markuz for contributing on my behalf whenever i asked you for a favor. Besides that, i'm thankful to music!”
commentsLeonardo, Monterey, Mexico

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“This really does stretch one to stand on tiptoe and reach for Something Important to Say. Enough to state that what I have seen on this website excites and demands that I be a part of it.”
commentsKim, Tokyo

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The Distributed Exhibition

Project t.h.a.n.k.s. is part of The Distributed Exhibition, an initiative organized by artist Sara Thacher and hosted by the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA). Eleven artists got the opportunity to work closely with eleven owners of private residences and businesses in and around San Jose to realize site-specific artworks that were on view March 28th to May 17th, 2008.


Artists needed to be interested in responding to the unique layout, architectural features, personal display, or social dynamics of the space. The Distributed Exhibition asked: What might happen when artwork is created for a particular person, family, or living situation? What if private residences became display spaces? What if the occupants became gallerists? What if the viewers became guests? In order to view the works in the show, visitors must enter into a much more intimate situation than other art exhibition venues with a different social contract. The show crossed the boundaries between public and private, exploring an alternate mechanism for viewing and displaying art. It mixed the social context of a friend or trusted party invited into a personal space with the more distant relationship art consumer and gallerist or curator.


The Distributed Exhibition was funded by a CCA Center for Art and Public Life Grant and made possible with the support of the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA).
CCA Center for Public Art